Archive for the ‘ccc seminar’ Category

CCC social get-together

September 6, 2008

On Friday, September 12, we will have the first social get-together of the semester. Communications interested grad students from schools in the greater NYC area are cordially invited to join us at The Magician on the Lower East Side from 8 onwards.

Also on Facebook.

ccc feedback seminar, april 23, amy stuart

April 16, 2008

april 23, amy stuart (new school for social research) will present some research on ‘race and the public sphere: changing spaces of communication’, followed by a more general discussion. feel free to bring issues and questions to the table. the seminar takes place 08:00pm-10:00pm, room d1002, new school for social research, 79 fifth avenue (entrance on 16th street).

feedback seminar march 27 cancelled

March 25, 2008

unfortunately, we have had to cancel Jonah’s presentation tomorrow night. Amy Stuart is still on for April.

open CCC feedback seminar, Feb 20, NYU

February 18, 2008

CCC will host an open feedback seminar for graduate students, focusing on theory and methods in communications research. Bring your problems to the table, and we’ll help each other move on.

The session will take place from 08:00pm till 10:00pm in NYU’s Bobst Library (70 Washington Square South), room LL1-20, which is on the first level down. You will need your university ID to get in.

ccc feedback seminars, spring 2008

February 7, 2008

in the spring, ccc will host three feedback seminars, all at night, all informal occasions to discuss your work with other grad students, and maybe have a drink together afterwards.

feb 20, open session on theory and method in media research

march 26, jonah bossewitch (columbia)

april 23, amy stuart (new school for social research)

more here, but I can already tell y’all—it’ll be a riot.

ccc feedback seminar, ‘the public sphere as a normative concept’, girard

November 26, 2007

on november 29, 08:00-10:00pm, at the graduate school of journalism, columbia university, room 107d, we will host the last ccc feedback seminar of the fall semester. charles girard (paris-1/sorbonne) will present work-in-progress on ‘the public sphere as a normative concept – from political theory to communication studies’. the abstract is below:

‘The Public Sphere as a Normative Concept – From Political Theory to Communication Studies’

 

 

Originated in social theory and political theory, the concept of the public sphere has become over the past forty years one of the most important conceptual references in communication studies. Inspired by the seminal work of Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, but also by some of his critics (for instance Nancy Fraser or Craig Calhoun), contemporary media research has turned the reference to the concept of the public sphere into one of its defining and legitimizing theoretical routines. However, uses of this concept in contemporary media research are characterized by a recurring ambiguity. Used as a normative concept, the public sphere refers to the set of ideal conditions that characterizes democratic public debate and satisfies demanding standards of transparency, rationality and inclusion. In that first sense, the public sphere is an ideal by comparison with which one can assess the deliberative value of actual media conversations. Nonetheless, used as a positive concept, the public sphere refers to all forms of communication taking place in a public setting, to all actual interactions happening outside of the private realm. In that second sense, the public sphere is a “space” that actually exists and can be described as well as explained. It is not an ideal and it is most of the time considered to be far from ideal. This presentation will outline the risks inherent to an undifferentiated use of these two very different conceptions of the public sphere. By studying the evolution of this notion from political philosophy to communication studies in the past forty years, I will emphasize the need to clearly distinguish between a positive concept and a normative concept of the public sphere and I will point out the theoretical difficulties inherent to this much needed separation.

ccc feedback seminar, ‘the public sphere as a normative concept’, girard

November 6, 2007

on november 29, 08:00-10:00pm, at the graduate school of journalism, columbia university, room 107d, we will host the last ccc feedback seminar of the fall semester. charles girard (paris-1/sorbonne) will present work-in-progress on ‘the public sphere as a normative concept – from political theory to communication studies’. the abstract is below:

‘The Public Sphere as a Normative Concept – From Political Theory to Communication Studies’

 

 

Originated in social theory and political theory, the concept of the public sphere has become over the past forty years one of the most important conceptual references in communication studies. Inspired by the seminal work of Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, but also by some of his critics (for instance Nancy Fraser or Craig Calhoun), contemporary media research has turned the reference to the concept of the public sphere into one of its defining and legitimizing theoretical routines. However, uses of this concept in contemporary media research are characterized by a recurring ambiguity. Used as a normative concept, the public sphere refers to the set of ideal conditions that characterizes democratic public debate and satisfies demanding standards of transparency, rationality and inclusion. In that first sense, the public sphere is an ideal by comparison with which one can assess the deliberative value of actual media conversations. Nonetheless, used as a positive concept, the public sphere refers to all forms of communication taking place in a public setting, to all actual interactions happening outside of the private realm. In that second sense, the public sphere is a “space” that actually exists and can be described as well as explained. It is not an ideal and it is most of the time considered to be far from ideal. This presentation will outline the risks inherent to an undifferentiated use of these two very different conceptions of the public sphere. By studying the evolution of this notion from political philosophy to communication studies in the past forty years, I will emphasize the need to clearly distinguish between a positive concept and a normative concept of the public sphere and I will point out the theoretical difficulties inherent to this much needed separation.

ccc feedback seminar, ‘epistemology of media sociology’, stonbely

October 20, 2007

thursday october 25th, 08:00-10:00pm (after daniel dayan’s lecture), at the new school for social research, room 907b, 79 fifth avenue, ccc is hosting its monthly feedback seminar.

last time, seven graduate students from four universities showed up, and the discussion was very fruitful. and there is always room for more–so bring your physical body and your (academic, preferably) issues to the table. there will be drinks afterwards, for those so inclined.

the main presenter will be sarah stonbely (culture & communications, nyu), who will present work in progress under the title ‘epistemology of media sociology’–see abstract below.

abstract: what qualifies as sociology of media research? what is the intellectual history of this subfield? what are its foci, and its methods? what should media sociology research strive to be? barbie zelizer says of the sociology of journalism – and i think it applies just as well to sociology of media – that it emphasizes people, “with an eye both to the patterns by which they group themselves into organizational and institutional settings and to the surrounding structures, functions, and effects through which they work.” i further propose that media sociology research deals primarily with media that reaches some group of people (either mass or niche) and that the theory and methods used have to be sociological, meaning media must be understood in conjunction with social interactions. this discussion will outline the parameters of the field of media sociology. the intellectual exercise of codifying a field of research has its aims in a clearer understanding of what qualifies as media sociology research, which theories and methods are most appropriate, and which areas need further exploration.